Discussion:
Elections between family members
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John Chessant
2018-04-20 03:45:58 UTC
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In the 1994 Massachusetts gubernatorial election, the incumbent Bill Weld defeated Democratic challenger Mark Roosevelt. It turned out that the two candidates were second-cousins-in-law to each other; Mark Roosevelt and Bill Weld's spouse, Susan Roosevelt Weld, were both great-grandchildren of President Theodore Roosevelt.

Obviously, elections between 'close' family members would be unusual since there is usually not too much variation in political leanings of members of the same family of politicians. (An exception is the Udall family, which counts among its members four recent U.S. senators, two from each party: Tom Udall (D-NM, 2009-present), Mark Udall (D-CO, 2009-2015), Gordon Smith (R-OR, 1997-2009), and Mike Lee (R-UT, 2011-present).)

Are there other examples of elections between family members?
David Tenner
2018-04-20 15:10:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Chessant
In the 1994 Massachusetts gubernatorial election, the incumbent Bill
Weld defeated Democratic challenger Mark Roosevelt. It turned out that
the two candidates were second-cousins-in-law to each other; Mark
Roosevelt and Bill Weld's spouse, Susan Roosevelt Weld, were both
great-grandchildren of President Theodore Roosevelt.
Obviously, elections between 'close' family members would be unusual
since there is usually not too much variation in political leanings of
members of the same family of politicians. (An exception is the Udall
family, which counts among its members four recent U.S. senators, two
from each party: Tom Udall (D-NM, 2009-present), Mark Udall (D-CO,
2009-2015), Gordon Smith (R-OR, 1997-2009), and Mike Lee (R-UT,
2011-present).)
Are there other examples of elections between family members?
Well, there were the Taylor brothers of Tennessee who ran aginst each other
for governor:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Love_Taylor.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_A._Taylor

For more distant relatives: Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. was a conceivable if
unlikely GOP presidential candidate against FDR.

If we look beyond the US, there is Ed Miliband vs. David Miliband for the
Labour Party leadership in the UK...
--
David Tenner
***@ameritech.net
Graham Truesdale
2018-04-20 21:42:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Tenner
Post by John Chessant
In the 1994 Massachusetts gubernatorial election, the incumbent Bill
Weld defeated Democratic challenger Mark Roosevelt. It turned out that
the two candidates were second-cousins-in-law to each other; Mark
Roosevelt and Bill Weld's spouse, Susan Roosevelt Weld, were both
great-grandchildren of President Theodore Roosevelt.
Obviously, elections between 'close' family members would be unusual
since there is usually not too much variation in political leanings of
members of the same family of politicians. (An exception is the Udall
family, which counts among its members four recent U.S. senators, two
from each party: Tom Udall (D-NM, 2009-present), Mark Udall (D-CO,
2009-2015), Gordon Smith (R-OR, 1997-2009), and Mike Lee (R-UT,
2011-present).)
Are there other examples of elections between family members?
Well, there were the Taylor brothers of Tennessee who ran aginst each other
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Love_Taylor.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_A._Taylor
For more distant relatives: Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. was a conceivable if
unlikely GOP presidential candidate against FDR.
If we look beyond the US, there is Ed Miliband vs. David Miliband for the
Labour Party leadership in the UK...
Austen Chamberlain (UK Conservative party leader in the House of Commons, 1921-2) and Neville Chamberlain (UK Conservative party overall leader, 1937-40) were sons of the same father - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Chamberlain. If Stanley Baldwin had died or retired during https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Baldwin_ministry - those two might have been the main contenders to become Conservative party leader and PM - although the choice would have been made by the monarch rather than by election.
John Chessant
2018-04-22 08:16:14 UTC
Permalink
John Chessant wrote in
Post by John Chessant
In the 1994 Massachusetts gubernatorial election, the incumbent Bill
Weld defeated Democratic challenger Mark Roosevelt. It turned out that
the two candidates were second-cousins-in-law to each other; Mark
Roosevelt and Bill Weld's spouse, Susan Roosevelt Weld, were both
great-grandchildren of President Theodore Roosevelt.
Obviously, elections between 'close' family members would be unusual
since there is usually not too much variation in political leanings of
members of the same family of politicians. (An exception is the Udall
family, which counts among its members four recent U.S. senators, two
from each party: Tom Udall (D-NM, 2009-present), Mark Udall (D-CO,
2009-2015), Gordon Smith (R-OR, 1997-2009), and Mike Lee (R-UT,
2011-present).)
Are there other examples of elections between family members?
Well, there were the Taylor brothers of Tennessee who ran aginst each other
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Love_Taylor.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_A._Taylor
For more distant relatives: Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. was a conceivable if
unlikely GOP presidential candidate against FDR.
If we look beyond the US, there is Ed Miliband vs. David Miliband for the
Labour Party leadership in the UK...
--
David Tenner
Wow; according to Wikipedia, "the Prohibition Party offered its nomination to the Taylors' father, Nathaniel Taylor, but he declined".
Post by John Chessant
John Chessant wrote in
Post by John Chessant
In the 1994 Massachusetts gubernatorial election, the incumbent Bill
Weld defeated Democratic challenger Mark Roosevelt. It turned out that
the two candidates were second-cousins-in-law to each other; Mark
Roosevelt and Bill Weld's spouse, Susan Roosevelt Weld, were both
great-grandchildren of President Theodore Roosevelt.
Obviously, elections between 'close' family members would be unusual
since there is usually not too much variation in political leanings of
members of the same family of politicians. (An exception is the Udall
family, which counts among its members four recent U.S. senators, two
from each party: Tom Udall (D-NM, 2009-present), Mark Udall (D-CO,
2009-2015), Gordon Smith (R-OR, 1997-2009), and Mike Lee (R-UT,
2011-present).)
Are there other examples of elections between family members?
Well, there were the Taylor brothers of Tennessee who ran aginst each other
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Love_Taylor.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_A._Taylor
For more distant relatives: Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. was a conceivable if
unlikely GOP presidential candidate against FDR.
If we look beyond the US, there is Ed Miliband vs. David Miliband for the
Labour Party leadership in the UK...
Austen Chamberlain (UK Conservative party leader in the House of Commons, 1921-2) and Neville Chamberlain (UK Conservative party overall leader, 1937-40) were sons of the same father - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Chamberlain. If Stanley Baldwin had died or retired during https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Baldwin_ministry - those two might have been the main contenders to become Conservative party leader and PM - although the choice would have been made by the monarch rather than by election.
All the other answers are great as well.
Rich Rostrom
2018-04-23 05:57:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Chessant
Are there other examples of elections between family members?
There might have been a Bayard-Bayard contest
in Delaware; Richard H. Bayard, U.S. Senator
1835-1844 as an Anti-Jacksonian and Whig, versus
his brother James A. Bayard jr, Senator 1851-1860
as a Democrat.

They were only three years apart in age: Richard
was born in 1796, James jr in 1799.
--
Nous sommes dans une pot de chambre, et nous y serons emmerdés.
--- General Auguste-Alexandre Ducrot at Sedan, 1870.
David Tenner
2018-04-23 07:51:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rich Rostrom
Post by John Chessant
Are there other examples of elections between family members?
There might have been a Bayard-Bayard contest
in Delaware; Richard H. Bayard, U.S. Senator
1835-1844 as an Anti-Jacksonian and Whig, versus
his brother James A. Bayard jr, Senator 1851-1860
as a Democrat.
They were only three years apart in age: Richard
was born in 1796, James jr in 1799.
In 1798 Democratic-Republican Edward Livingston defeated his Federalist
cousin Philip Livingston in the election for the US House of Representatives
from New York's Second Congressional District.
https://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=282142
--
David Tenner
***@ameritech.net
David Tenner
2018-04-24 03:50:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Tenner
Post by Rich Rostrom
Post by John Chessant
Are there other examples of elections between family members?
There might have been a Bayard-Bayard contest
in Delaware; Richard H. Bayard, U.S. Senator
1835-1844 as an Anti-Jacksonian and Whig, versus
his brother James A. Bayard jr, Senator 1851-1860
as a Democrat.
They were only three years apart in age: Richard
was born in 1796, James jr in 1799.
In 1798 Democratic-Republican Edward Livingston defeated his Federalist
cousin Philip Livingston in the election for the US House of
Representatives from New York's Second Congressional District.
https://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=282142
Here's another non-US example:

"Following the constitution, another presidential election was held, in which
two brothers, Anote and Harry Tong, were the two main candidates (the third
one, Banuera Berina won just 9.1%). Anote Tong, London School of Economics
graduate, won on 4 July 2003, and was sworn in as president soon afterward.
He was re-elected in 2007 and in 2012 for a third term."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Kiribati#Post_independent
--
David Tenner
***@ameritech.net
Rhino
2018-04-24 21:38:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Chessant
In the 1994 Massachusetts gubernatorial election, the incumbent Bill Weld defeated Democratic challenger Mark Roosevelt. It turned out that the two candidates were second-cousins-in-law to each other; Mark Roosevelt and Bill Weld's spouse, Susan Roosevelt Weld, were both great-grandchildren of President Theodore Roosevelt.
Obviously, elections between 'close' family members would be unusual since there is usually not too much variation in political leanings of members of the same family of politicians. (An exception is the Udall family, which counts among its members four recent U.S. senators, two from each party: Tom Udall (D-NM, 2009-present), Mark Udall (D-CO, 2009-2015), Gordon Smith (R-OR, 1997-2009), and Mike Lee (R-UT, 2011-present).)
Are there other examples of elections between family members?
How about the two Polish brothers, Jerzy and Lech Kaczynsky - identical
twins - who both held high office a few years back. Lech - and a lot of
other Polish dignitaries - died in a plane crash in Russia as he flew to
commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Katyn Forest massacre by
Stalin's NKVD.

Or the Kim regimes in North Korea which are effectively a dynasty at
this point? Of course, they are not democratically elected so maybe they
aren't quite what you're thinking about.
--
Rhino
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