Discussion:
Seventh-Day Adventist Cornflakes
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David Tenner
2017-07-04 00:29:58 UTC
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"Nurturing good health became central to Seventh-day Adventism's identity: a
means not only of purifying believers, but of winning converts. The church
began to publish journals such as the *Health Reformer* aimed at a general
reader, and to establish sanatoriums and spas where patients of any religion
might 'become acquainted with the chraacter and ways of our people, see a
beauty in the religion of the Bible, and be led into the Lord's service.' One
result of this was the long and fruitful, though eventually unhappy,
partnership between [Ellen] White and John Harvey Kellogg, nutritionist,
health reformer and the inventor of cornflakes. White, who did not
particularly like cornflakes, turned down the opportunity for the church to
own the Kellogg's brand. It was an expensive decision, but it might have
saved the church's identity from being swallowed up in a commercial empire.
After she had kept her church's soul pure throughout her long life--she
finally died in 1915--it would have been a shame to have sold it for
breakfast cereal..." Alec Rylie, Protestants: The Faith That Made the Modern
World, p. 224. https://books.google.com/books?id=ZWKaDgAAQBAJ&pg=PA224

POD: Ellen White https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellen_G._White likes
cornflakes better, and accepts Kellogg's offer...
--
David Tenner
***@ameritech.net
Rich Rostrom
2017-07-04 17:16:45 UTC
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Post by David Tenner
POD: Ellen White https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellen_G._White likes
cornflakes better, and accepts Kellogg's offer...
Very interesting suggestion.

1) Would this damage the Kellogg brand? A lot of
evangelical Christians regard SDA doctrine a
dangerously heretical. They don't advocate
persecuting individual SDAs, who are seen as
well-meaning, but deluded, but they might
refuse to do business with an SDA brand.

2) Would this generate a significant cash flow
for the SDA church? What could the church
do with extra money? Would the money corrupt
the church leadership?
--
The real Velvet Revolution - and the would-be hijacker.

http://originalvelvetrevolution.com
w***@gmail.com
2017-07-08 16:49:00 UTC
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Post by David Tenner
"Nurturing good health became central to Seventh-day Adventism's identity: a
means not only of purifying believers, but of winning converts. The church
particularly like cornflakes, turned down the opportunity for the church to
own the Kellogg's brand. It was an expensive decision, but it might have
saved the church's identity from being swallowed up in a commercial empire.
POD: Ellen White https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellen_G._White likes
cornflakes better, and accepts Kellogg's offer...
What about the possibility that more resources from selling corn flakes gives Adventism the ability to spread their message farther and/or more effectively? (Not just by access to money but through exposure to modern marketing techniques that could be applied to recruiting members to the church.) How does a more successful church affect US (and world?) culture in the teens, 20s and beyond?

More converts, especially in foreign countries, also raises the issue of more repression against members of the church--historically Seventh Day Adventists were persecuted in the USSR and in today's Russia.

I think a more successful Seventh Day Adventist church has a lot of interesting implications for both pre-war and post-WWII America.

wes
w***@gmail.com
2017-07-10 16:50:59 UTC
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Post by w***@gmail.com
O
I think a more successful Seventh Day Adventist church has a lot of interesting implications for both pre-war and post-WWII America.
Ok, I know it's bad form to follow up my own post, but I found some evidence to back up my hunch--a more successful Seventh Day Adventist church is going to have some interesting implications for diversity.

One characteristics of modern Christendom in the USA is that most people attending services with others very like themselves. A 2015 PEW survey shows that most religious groups are quite homogeneous in terms of race/ethnicity.

However, the three most racially/ethnically diverse religious groups in the USA are Seventh Day Adventists, Muslims, and Jehovah's Witnesses. 37% of Adventists are white, 32% black, and 15% Latino.

(http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/07/27/the-most-and-least-racially-diverse-u-s-religious-groups/)

So if an earlier, bigger, more successful, more high profile Seventh Day Adventist church is equally diverse, doesn't that raise some interesting implications for race relations in the USA during the 20s, 30s, etc.?

Maybe this makes it harder for conservative Protestant Christianity to be linked with segregationist thought by the time the 60s and 70s happen?

wes

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