Discussion:
WI Jane Seymour hadn't died in 1537?
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David Tenner
2018-04-21 21:49:49 UTC
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"Henry VIII’s third wife Jane Seymour, whom he married in 1536, was an ardent
and pious Catholic and was horrified by the reforms. Though she was not able
to influence his policies, she was able to reconcile him with his Catholic
daughter Mary from whom he had been estranged following the divorce from her
mother Catherine of Aragon. Due to Jane’s short tenure as queen, however,
she was not able to accomplish much else except, of course, for her great
victory--the birth of the next king...

"Now the question. Would Edward VI have become a fanatical Protestant if his
mother had survived his birth? As she was not an educated woman, she most
likely would not have become her son’s regent during the duration of his
minority, however, as his mother, she still would have wielded considerable
influence over him. And as a devout Catholic, she would have always have
been suspicious of Cranmer, and this stance would most likely have made an
impression on her son..."

https://www.historyandheadlines.com/jane-seymour-survived/
--
David Tenner
***@ameritech.net
Robert Woodward
2018-04-22 04:58:00 UTC
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Post by David Tenner
"Henry VIII’s third wife Jane Seymour, whom he married in 1536, was an ardent
and pious Catholic and was horrified by the reforms. Though she was not able
to influence his policies, she was able to reconcile him with his Catholic
daughter Mary from whom he had been estranged following the divorce from her
mother Catherine of Aragon. Due to Jane’s short tenure as queen, however,
she was not able to accomplish much else except, of course, for her great
victory--the birth of the next king...
"Now the question. Would Edward VI have become a fanatical Protestant if his
mother had survived his birth? As she was not an educated woman, she most
likely would not have become her son’s regent during the duration of his
minority, however, as his mother, she still would have wielded considerable
influence over him. And as a devout Catholic, she would have always have
been suspicious of Cranmer, and this stance would most likely have made an
impression on her son..."
https://www.historyandheadlines.com/jane-seymour-survived/
If she had more sons* that could have resulted in the Tudors lasting
more generations on the male line, leaving Elizabeth as a footnote and
the Stuarts in Scotland.

*Edward VI would then have been succeeded by his hypothetical younger
brother (another Duke of York succeeding to the throne, just like his
father).
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
‹-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
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