Discussion:
Attempting to leave the Netherlands in 1929, Andreas van Kuijk is arrested for murder
(too old to reply)
David Tenner
2017-08-10 15:35:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
So there's no "Colonel Tom Parker."
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/colonel-parker-managed-elvis-career-but-was-he-a-killer-on-the-lam-108042206/

Effects on Elvis Presley's career? Elvis said toward the end of his life "I
don't think I'd have ever been very big if it wasn't for him. He's a very
smart man." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonel_Tom_Parker But having
the Colonel as manager also had its downside, as Ed Ward notes in *The
History of Rock & Roll, Volume One, 1920-1963,* p. 178:

"Elvis drove downtown to pick up his draft notice, stopped in at Sun to show
it off, and then went back to Graceland, where his friend George Klein saw
the notice and asked what he was going to do. 'Man, I don't know,' he told
Klein. 'The Colonel says we might could get a deferment to make King Creole
[his next film], but he says I probably got to go.' The Colonel was adamant
that no boats should be rocked at any time in Elvis's career, for a good
reason that didn't surface for many, many years: everyone knew he'd bought
his "Colonel" title, but he wasn't Tom Parker at all. He was Andreas van
Kuijk, a Dutch citizen who'd escaped the law (perhaps, as his sister later
surmised, for indictment for murder) and stowed away on a ship to America in
his late teens. He wasn't an American citizen, didn't have a passport
because he was in the country illegally, and, thus, would never leave the
United States and deflected all the government's gaze away from Elvis and,
by association, himself. Throughout Elvis's career, he paid their taxes with
the simplified Form 1040, although it meant giving up loads of deductions he
could have claimed (and, at a 50 percent management fee, wildly
disproportionate to the 15-20 percent other managers charged, taking money
out of his own pocket), and refused huge offers to have Elvis appear
overseas. For all of Colonel Tom Parker's bluff and colorful image, Andreas
van Kuijk lived in a world of fear. Colonel Tom knew people who could do
things for Elvis. Van Kuijk didn't dare call them..."
https://books.google.com/books?id=nBnyCwAAQBAJ&pg=PA178

--
David Tenner
***@ameritech.net
The Old Man
2017-08-10 16:10:54 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Tenner
So there's no "Colonel Tom Parker."
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/colonel-parker-managed-elvis-career-but-was-he-a-killer-on-the-lam-108042206/
Effects on Elvis Presley's career? Elvis said toward the end of his life "I
don't think I'd have ever been very big if it wasn't for him. He's a very
smart man." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonel_Tom_Parker But having
the Colonel as manager also had its downside, as Ed Ward notes in *The
"Elvis drove downtown to pick up his draft notice, stopped in at Sun to show
it off, and then went back to Graceland, where his friend George Klein saw
the notice and asked what he was going to do. 'Man, I don't know,' he told
Klein. 'The Colonel says we might could get a deferment to make King Creole
[his next film], but he says I probably got to go.' The Colonel was adamant
that no boats should be rocked at any time in Elvis's career, for a good
reason that didn't surface for many, many years: everyone knew he'd bought
his "Colonel" title, but he wasn't Tom Parker at all. He was Andreas van
Kuijk, a Dutch citizen who'd escaped the law (perhaps, as his sister later
surmised, for indictment for murder) and stowed away on a ship to America in
his late teens. He wasn't an American citizen, didn't have a passport
because he was in the country illegally, and, thus, would never leave the
United States and deflected all the government's gaze away from Elvis and,
by association, himself. Throughout Elvis's career, he paid their taxes with
the simplified Form 1040, although it meant giving up loads of deductions he
could have claimed (and, at a 50 percent management fee, wildly
disproportionate to the 15-20 percent other managers charged, taking money
out of his own pocket), and refused huge offers to have Elvis appear
overseas. For all of Colonel Tom Parker's bluff and colorful image, Andreas
van Kuijk lived in a world of fear. Colonel Tom knew people who could do
things for Elvis. Van Kuijk didn't dare call them..."
https://books.google.com/books?id=nBnyCwAAQBAJ&pg=PA178
--
David Tenner
I think that Elvis would have had a career somewhat like Hank Snow's was. Snow was a Country singer with a reasonably good career who lived to be 85 years old who was "represented" by Parker in the early 1950s and dumped him when he found out that Parker's cut was improperly high.
Without Parker, Presley might have stayed at Sun longer and stayed more in the Rockabilly mode throughout his career. I doubt that he would have gotten into films as deeply (thus sparing the world a total waste of time) and would have only gone to Vegas as a tourist. No Vegas means (ISTM) no drugs and no early death.
Perhaps he might have developed a place like other stars in Branson, Missouri as the Opry wasn't really ready for his brand of entertainment, although with no Parker, that might have changed as well.
So it's possible that in that ATL, Presley would have lived longer, dying at ago 80 in 2015 at his home in central Missouri, surrounded by his wife, children and grandchildren. He might not have been quite as famous as in OTL, but he would have been around longer and had a more notable career.

Regards,
John Braungart
Rich Rostrom
2017-08-11 08:46:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Old Man
I doubt that he would have gotten into films as
deeply (thus sparing the world a total waste of
time)...
There's a lot of fun in some of those movies.

And I especially liked _Follow That Dream_,
in which Elvis played a character perfectly
suited to him - a big, gentle country boy
who doesn't quite understand what's going on,
but always ends up with the winning position.
--
The real Velvet Revolution - and the would-be hijacker.

http://originalvelvetrevolution.com
The Old Man
2017-08-11 11:39:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Rich Rostrom
Post by The Old Man
I doubt that he would have gotten into films as
deeply (thus sparing the world a total waste of
time)...
There's a lot of fun in some of those movies.
And I especially liked _Follow That Dream_,
in which Elvis played a character perfectly
suited to him - a big, gentle country boy
who doesn't quite understand what's going on,
but always ends up with the winning position.
--
The real Velvet Revolution - and the would-be hijacker.
http://originalvelvetrevolution.com
Most of them provided a music background for the kids in the car at the drive-in doing what came naturally. Other than that they were more of a night-light...
But truly, we'll never see their like anymore and that's probably a shame.
Okay, I'll leave now.

Regards,
John Braungart

Loading...