Discussion:
Is anyone familiar with the Battle of Camerone, Mexico?
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b***@hotmail.com
2006-03-31 16:37:52 UTC
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Battle of Camerone:

http://www.globusz.com/ebooks/LuisSilva/00000015.htm

In my research I have heard varying figures for the size of the French
force. Some say it was 65 strong, others say 70, and others 72? Can
anyone clarify?

Thanks.

Brian Ghilliotti
Jack Linthicum
2006-04-01 18:30:50 UTC
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Post by b***@hotmail.com
http://www.globusz.com/ebooks/LuisSilva/00000015.htm
In my research I have heard varying figures for the size of the French
force. Some say it was 65 strong, others say 70, and others 72? Can
anyone clarify?
Thanks.
Brian Ghilliotti
would you accept a statement from the French Embassy?

http://www.ambafrance-us.org/atoz/legion/history.asp

"HISTORY

The French Foreign Legion has inherited the traditions of foreign
troops who have served France since the Middle Ages.

Every one has heard of the Scottish Guards of Charles the VIIth, the
Swiss Guards of the Bourbon Kings, and Napoleon's Polish Lancers.

Louis Philippe, "King of the French" created the French Foreign Legion
on March 10, 1831.

Composed exclusively of volunteers aged between 18 and 40, with or
without means of identification, the Legion was immediately involved in
the conquest of Algeria before passing under Spanish control in 1835.

A second Legion was then created which fought in Algeria, in Crimea
(1855), in Italy (1859) and in Mexico (1863). In Mexico, it won one of
its greatest titles to fame: on April 30, 1863, at the Camerone
Hacienda near Puebla, 3 officers and 62 legionnaires resisted 2,000
Mexicans. After a day of heroic fighting the last five survivors fixed
bayonets and charged.

This battle, whose name adorns every Legion flag, remains the symbol of
a mission carried out to the bitter end. " <more>
Kris Overstreet
2006-04-03 01:00:22 UTC
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On 1 Apr 2006 10:30:50 -0800, "Jack Linthicum"
Post by Jack Linthicum
A second Legion was then created which fought in Algeria, in Crimea
(1855), in Italy (1859) and in Mexico (1863). In Mexico, it won one of
its greatest titles to fame: on April 30, 1863, at the Camerone
Hacienda near Puebla, 3 officers and 62 legionnaires resisted 2,000
Mexicans. After a day of heroic fighting the last five survivors fixed
bayonets and charged.
That doesn't sound like glory to me- more like stupidity.

Whose is a matter of debate, but 65 v. 2,000 to the death is
definitely stupidity -somewhere.-

Redneck
cedric
2006-04-03 21:35:39 UTC
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Just because a story is fraught with stupidity doesn't mean it can't be
protrayed as a glorious struggle to the death.

Remember the "charge of the light brigade"
Jack Linthicum
2006-04-03 21:46:45 UTC
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Post by cedric
Just because a story is fraught with stupidity doesn't mean it can't be
protrayed as a glorious struggle to the death.
Remember the "charge of the light brigade"
Chapultepec?

"Los Niños Héroes

During the battle, six Mexican military cadets refused to fall back
when General Bravo finally ordered retreat, and fought to the death
against superior U.S. forces. One by one they fell; when one was left
(Juan Escutia), and the US forces about to kill him, he grabbed the
Mexican flag, wrapped it around himself and jumped off the castle
point."

L***@gmail.com
2006-04-01 21:15:57 UTC
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Post by b***@hotmail.com
http://www.globusz.com/ebooks/LuisSilva/00000015.htm
In my research I have heard varying figures for the size of the French
force. Some say it was 65 strong, others say 70, and others 72? Can
anyone clarify?
I thought it was around 75,000, as the American Army that defeated the
French in the Second Mexican American War outnumbered its opponent two
to one; that disaster helped establish the second republic back in
Paris.

Ah, well.

Cheers

L
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