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Had the Holocaust not occurred, how much more developed would science and technology be?
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WolfBear
2017-07-02 23:34:36 UTC
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Had the Holocaust not occurred (the best way to do this is probably to kill Adolf Hitler early enough), how much more developed would science and technology be today?

Basically, the Jews are a very talented people (in terms of their wealth, how much Nobel Prizes they win, et cetera) and thus I was wondering how much of a boost the development of science and technology would have if six million additional Jews as well as their descendants survived.

Indeed, any thoughts on this?
jerry kraus
2017-07-03 13:33:54 UTC
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Post by WolfBear
Had the Holocaust not occurred (the best way to do this is probably to kill Adolf Hitler early enough), how much more developed would science and technology be today?
Basically, the Jews are a very talented people (in terms of their wealth, how much Nobel Prizes they win, et cetera) and thus I was wondering how much of a boost the development of science and technology would have if six million additional Jews as well as their descendants survived.
Indeed, any thoughts on this?
Hard to say. It's not clear Jews are any smarter than anyone else, genetically, it's the Jewish culture that is education and achievement oriented which probably makes the difference. In any case, the Holocaust gave enormous additional leverage to the surviving Jews in the world, so, whatever talents they had were given rather more scope to develop, as a result of it. Antisemitism would probably be alive and well, still, in the world, without the Holocaust, there would probably be no state of Israel, and Jews would still be a repressed minority with few opportunities.
x
2017-11-14 22:21:27 UTC
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Post by WolfBear
Had the Holocaust not occurred (the best way to do this is probably to kill Adolf Hitler early enough), how much more developed would science and technology be today?
Basically, the Jews are a very talented people (in terms of their wealth, how much Nobel Prizes they win, et cetera) and thus I was wondering how much of a boost the development of science and technology would have if six million additional Jews as well as their descendants survived.
Indeed, any thoughts on this?
WolfBear
2017-11-15 03:39:48 UTC
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Post by WolfBear
Had the Holocaust not occurred (the best way to do this is probably to kill Adolf Hitler early enough), how much more developed would science and technology be today?
Basically, the Jews are a very talented people (in terms of their wealth, how much Nobel Prizes they win, et cetera) and thus I was wondering how much of a boost the development of science and technology would have if six million additional Jews as well as their descendants survived.
Indeed, any thoughts on this?
Umm ... Yes?
Insane Ranter
2017-11-15 12:40:36 UTC
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Post by WolfBear
Post by WolfBear
Had the Holocaust not occurred (the best way to do this is probably to kill Adolf Hitler early enough), how much more developed would science and technology be today?
Basically, the Jews are a very talented people (in terms of their wealth, how much Nobel Prizes they win, et cetera) and thus I was wondering how much of a boost the development of science and technology would have if six million additional Jews as well as their descendants survived.
Indeed, any thoughts on this?
Umm ... Yes?
A better question to ask if WW2 hadn't happened and the 70-80(?) million people had not died would we be better off?
Dimensional Traveler
2017-11-15 15:51:53 UTC
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Post by Insane Ranter
Post by WolfBear
Post by WolfBear
Had the Holocaust not occurred (the best way to do this is probably to kill Adolf Hitler early enough), how much more developed would science and technology be today?
Basically, the Jews are a very talented people (in terms of their wealth, how much Nobel Prizes they win, et cetera) and thus I was wondering how much of a boost the development of science and technology would have if six million additional Jews as well as their descendants survived.
Indeed, any thoughts on this?
Umm ... Yes?
A better question to ask if WW2 hadn't happened and the 70-80(?) million people had not died would we be better off?
If WW2 hadn't happened would there have been the imperative to advance
science and technology so hard?
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
s***@yahoo.com
2017-11-16 09:39:34 UTC
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I suspect the bulk of the murder victims were not from modern high-tech places, and wouldn't have been inventing any big-ticket items. Since Germans had been suffering the pre-war slow boil early victimhood, a lot of them, such as Lisa Meitner and Einstein got out.

The war in general, not just the mass murder, caused severe disruption and wildly shifting priorities. Television was a very popular 1930's new tech, featured in fiction. It was probably set back years. Yes, late war missiles were TV guided, but that was small secret programs. I suspect computers were slowed down some. Kuno Zuse was having fun making them with his family, but got very little business. I think the Luftwaffe bought one. When moderns comiserated with him about lack of success, he said considering who was running things then, it's just as well.

Now, for those of you actually taking the risky time travel trip to save folks, don't go expecting Mr Hitler to be all that important. Yes he talked up anti-semitism, but that was an old 1870 Austian political trick, stirring up the rubes with fake threats, leading to crystal nacht modest numbers of murders, and actually theft was a bigger goal of it. The Wannsee conference notes make a good case that the purpose of the mass murder was a weasely scheme by the SS to pump up their own importance.

I don't want to be a total downer. I feel strongly that if the war had been mostly prevented the whole 20th ct. would have been hugely more productive. We were staring down the commies for half of it, with staggeringly unimaginably expensive unusable death machines. A tiny war followed by a true peace would have left us with resources to fly to the moon and beyond on a lark.

Nils K. Hammer
Rich Rostrom
2017-11-21 16:22:01 UTC
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Post by s***@yahoo.com
Television was a very popular 1930's new tech, featured in fiction.
In the 1939 film _Raffles_, starring David Niven as
"The Amateur Cracksman", there is a scene in which
two Scotland Yard higher-ups discuss the mysterious
burglar's exploits. Then one of them turns on a TV
set to watch the Test match (in which Raffles is
bowling).

Yeah. Watching sports on TV in 1939 - and there is
no indication that this is some miracle to be pointed
out to the audience, they just do it.
--
Nous sommes dans une pot de chambre, et nous y serons emmerdés.
--- General Auguste-Alexandre Ducrot at Sedan, 1870.
pyotr filipivich
2017-11-22 16:45:03 UTC
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Post by Rich Rostrom
Post by s***@yahoo.com
Television was a very popular 1930's new tech, featured in fiction.
In the 1939 film _Raffles_, starring David Niven as
"The Amateur Cracksman", there is a scene in which
two Scotland Yard higher-ups discuss the mysterious
burglar's exploits. Then one of them turns on a TV
set to watch the Test match (in which Raffles is
bowling).
Yeah. Watching sports on TV in 1939 - and there is
no indication that this is some miracle to be pointed
out to the audience, they just do it.
As my father would cheerfully point out "No one born since the
invention of TV has lived as long as I have" - Of course, he was born
three years before TV was "invented".

I also recall reading the ads for technical jobs in the Exciting
New Field of Broadcast Television, in the 1930s! Get trained, make
upwards of $1000 a year!

tschus
pyotr
--
pyotr filipivich.
For Sale: Uncirculated Roman Drachmas, feature Julius Ceaser's Portrait,
several dated 44 BCE. Comes with Certificate of Authenticity.
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